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Tuesday, February 9, 2010

King Jellyfish

The term king is used in various citations in the animal kingdom in reference to the animal with the biggest kind of superiority. With snakes, the term king is used in reference to the most dangerous venomous snake. In this case, it is the king cobra. Not that it is the most venomous snake, but the dosage that it administers is the most fatal. Looking at it in that similar context, the king jellyfish can easily be the box jellyfish.

This little critter is the most poisonous jellyfish in the deep. Its nematocysts hold the most fatal venom, which goes for the cardiovascular and the nervous system. The worst part is the accompanying pain. On a couple of occasions it has been described as unbearable and overbearing. Treating with vinegar has been considered as a first aid measure, but there is only so much it can do, because with the pain, it does nothing to alleviate it. Statistically speaking, without immediate treatment, the chances of survival of a box jellyfish sting are slim to none, especially for someone with a weak heart.

There are times when king is not used to cite the deadliness of the creature, but rather its size. Size always comes as a form of superiority in the animal kingdom, and with the jellyfish, its no exception. There are various species that surpass the normal dimensions of a deep sea jelly, and pointing one down to the king would not be accurately correct. But from a general point of view, the Nomura Jellyfish has been considered to rule the waters of the Eastern Pacific near the territorial waters of Japan. It is huge, and weighs over 300kgs, which for an animal without a skeletal system, is a big deal. In some far fetched classification, it can be considered as the king jellyfish.

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